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Impresión textil digital

5 tricks to create a good profile that only the best will know: 

A profile is one of the main concepts to know and master when talking about colour management. If you want to print accurate colours and get the most out of your colour output devices, you need to know the steps to get the best possible profile.

To start talking about profiles, we need to have the concept clear. So let’s go with a definition: 

A profile is a file that contains the colour information that can be interpreted by a device, either input (like a scanner or digital camera) or output (like a printer or screen). 

It is necessary to have two profiles: a standard one and the printer itself since the final profile will be created from a mathematical relation between the standard colour space (the input one) and the capacity of the device to interpret it. 

In this article, we will focus on the creation of profiles for digital printers. 

 

Introduction to the creation of profiles: 

To create a profile you will need to have some tools with you: a good Rip Software to help you interpret the capacity of your printer, a colour measurement device (spectrophotometer), the output device (The digital printer in this case), and other material needed (For example paper, fabric, plate, etc.)

In addition, we need to know which media you are going to use. If you are going to print on paper, the calibration and the consequent creation of the profile will be much easier, since only one material is involved in the process. 

If, on the other hand, we want to create a dye-sublimation profile, we have to take into account the tools that come into play: the plate, the fabric, the dye-sublimation paper, etc. so it is more complicated to create a stable profile. 

 

5 tips to create the best profiles: 

Now that we understand the concept of a print profile, we would like to share 5 tips that our technicians apply in order to obtain the best results: 

1.Create the profile using the final production conditions: It is important to understand that the process of creating a new profile aims to obtain the best colour results in the final productions. For this reason, it is necessary to reproduce the same printing conditions that we will use at the moment of truth. We do not recommend using cheaper paper or fabrics for calibration or using an iron instead of a calendar. With this, we only will obtain non-expected results. 

2. Work with Rip Software that facilitates the creation of the profile: It is very important to work with software that can understand the colour interpretation capacity of your printer, but it is also very necessary that the Rip Software facilitates the process of creating your profile. To do this, we recommend, first of all, that the Rip has a calibration wizard that guides you through this process step by step. 

3. Read, read and read: If you have ever worked with us or attended one of our courses you will know that there is a motto that we do always repeat: Read with the spectrophotometer three times. This way you will get three different colour results, which you can compare and get an average of the colour that will be the closest to the printing possibilities of your machine. 

4. Keep the printing devices in good condition: Check that at the time of creating the profile all the equipment involved in printing is in good condition and correctly configured. 

5. Profile and re-profile: We also recommend checking the printing results periodically and, if necessary, re-creating the profile. In neoStampa we have the option of re-profiling, which will allow you to analyse what has changed in your printer in order to adjust the profile again. 

We hope you have enjoyed our post and remember that if you have any doubts, you can contact us directly by writing to sales@inedit.com

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Design in RGB for better print results

Designing in RGB for printing is possible.

One of the first decisions we will have to face in the design process for printing will be the color method we want to use: CMYK or RGB. There is a general belief that we should work in RGB for designs that are going to be seen on a screen, while the CMYK method is for physical prints. Today in Inèdit’s blog we are going to dismantle this myth:

A bit of theory: CMYK vs RGB

The CMYK color model focuses on four colors: Cyan (C), Magenta (M), Yellow (Y) and Black (K). With CMYK we use the Subtractive method, by which colors are superimposed on the print to create the desired result. The absence of color will be white while 100% of the color black, but in addition, there is the “K” option that will allow us to create this black, with less ink consumption and a more intense color.
RGB is based on the colors Red (R), Green (G) and Blue (B) and works with additive synthesis, which consists of varying the intensity of light in the three main colors to create one again. This means that the more light we add, the brighter the results. So, 100% of light in each color will result in white and, conversely, 0% will result in black. In RGB, by playing with lightness we increase the variety of colors we can create compared to CMYK.

It is true that the vast majority of digital printers and plotters used to work in four-color printing, in other words, with the four colors that make up CMYK, limiting color results, but today this no longer happens.

Continue designing in CMYK?

In the digital printing sector things are changing a lot and color management and reproducibility are becoming more and more important.

Currently, printer manufacturers are focused on offering a greater number of inks, going beyond CMYK, in order to expand the color range of printing and be more competitive in the market.

We can find orange, blue, violet, turquoise, and even fluorescents in the ink options. In addition, the machines are constantly increasing their capacity, reaching to hold 8, 10 or even 12 different inks.
So we ask ourselves, does it make sense to keep working from the design only in CMYK, limiting the colors, when maybe the production printer has a wider color range?

Design in RGB to get the desired color results.
From our point of view, no. By using printers with a wider range of colors and working with all the necessary tools, it will be possible for you to end up printing the colors you see on screen, without having to juggle to imagine how the four CMYK inks will mix at the time of design.

One of the great allies for this color reproduction is the Rip Software you are using. For example, neoStampa is one of the rips that creates your print profiles in RGB. This allows you to have a standard color range, regardless of the number of inks in the printer, and that works in the same language as the designer’s screen or monitor. This way, you keep the color from the design until the final printing and the designer can focus on what really matters, creating with the colors that they like.

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Introduction to color management with Adobe® Photoshop

Adobe® Photoshop® is one of the main tools used for textile printing designers. But how should we manage color so that our textile design can be reproduced accurately?

In this Webinar, you will discover the answer to questions such as:

Why do we need Adobe® Photoshop® to print colors precisely?
How to use color modes?
What is a color profile and how to use it?
How to work in RGB mode?

Click on the video and enter the world of color management for textile design:

 

 

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Inèdit Software presents neoStampa Delta, featuring a DTG mode and a new PDF print engine.

The new release of Rip Software will feature a new engine for faster and more accurate PDF printing, a specific mode for DTG and  performance and color reproduction improvements.

Barcelona, November 9th 2020

On November 4th, Inèdit Software presented the new version of neoStampa Delta. They did it from a virtual event where the same creators of the software and several collaborators exposed the news of Rip Software, which aims to be a revolution in the digital printing sector. 

Until now, neoStampa has been the reference Rip Software in digital textile printing, especially for the most demanding ones with color reproduction, achieving the maximum potential of their printers. With the Delta version, the company intends to go one step further and extend the scope of neoStampa to other sectors such as sports printing, film, ceramics or DTG printing. 

One of the main new features of neoStampa is the incorporation of a new PDF engine, the Mako® system from Global Graphics®, which enables any PDF/X standard file to be replicated, guaranteeing consistent results. In addition, we can see an improvement in performance, printing up to 5 times faster. 

The incorporation of an improved PDF engine will allow the Rip Software to be for the first time a perfect option for sectors such as sports design printing, advertising graphics printing, ceramics, film, among many others. 

On the other hand, neoStampa Delta also includes the new DTG printing mode with which it will not only be possible to print directly to garment with better color results, but also to save up to 50% of white ink. neoStampa Delta includes a calibration wizard in just two steps and also a new white base adjustment under semi-transparent areas, which will allow  the savings mentioned above. 

Finally, neoStampa Delta has a new cost control system with which it will be possible to track jobs in real time, knowing the meters printed, the speed and the ink consumption, of all printers. 

With the incorporation of all these innovations, Inèdit Software offers to the digital printing market a versatile version, with a multitude of applications, in order to obtain the best color reproduction of each print. neoStampa is compatible with more than 700 digital printers and every month they are offering new compatibilities to the market. 

Inèdit Software has not yet revealed the release date of neoStampa Delta, however all the information is already available on its website, and there are also different ways of contacting those who want to try the software for free. 

More information: https://www.inedit.com/en/neostampa-delta/

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Global Graphics collaborates with Inèdit on digital textile production

Global Graphics Software, developers of core technology for digital printing, is collaborating with Inèdit, the authors of neoStampa, the most popular RIP software for textile digital printing, to create an enhanced PDF engine for textile workflows.

NeoStampa is compatible with most digital devices sold into the textile market including from vendors such as Mutoh, Epson, EFI Reggiani, Mimaki, and Konica Minolta. It allows the textile printer to connect potentially complex workflows, organizing job queues to send designs to different devices easily, and increases productivity. It is compatible with the leading textile design tools.

“The PDF format provides an enhanced way of communicating creative design and job/device instructions for textile design houses, mills and print centers,” comments Jeremy Spencer, Global Graphics Software’s vice president of business development. “We are one of the leading experts in PDF technology whose use is growing in the textiles market. So, to collaborate with a world-leading workflow provider such as Inèdit is a wonderful opportunity to expand our reach within the textile community.”

Likewise, Daniel Martinez, product owner at Inèdit Software assures that: “This collaboration with Global Graphics will mean a change in our clients’ results, providing them with improved precision in PDF printing, that, combined with our color management system, will make neoStampa the most complete RIP software on the digital textile printing market.”

Inèdit will be replacing their existing PDF Library with Global Graphics’ Mako™, an SDK that enables the creation of fast, scalable solutions for print workflows from PDFs or other vector formats. Among other benefits for the textile market, Mako gives control over color and images, providing quality rasters for the workflow, and combines precision with performance.
Ends

About Global Graphics Software
Global Graphics Software www.globalgraphics.com/software develops innovative core technology for digital print, including the Direct™ product range, the Harlequin RIP®, ScreenPro™, and Mako™. Customers include HP, Canon, Durst, Roland, Kodak, and Agfa. The roots of the company go back to 1986 and to the iconic university town of Cambridge, and, today the majority of the R&D team is still based near here. The US office is in Sarasota, Florida. Global Graphics Software is a subsidiary of Global Graphics PLC (Euronext: GLOG).

About Inèdit
Inèdit Software Is a worldwide company that offers software solutions for digital printing, creative design and color management, such us neoStampa, neoTextil and neoCatalog. At the same time, Inèdit Software is specialized on optimizing processes and integrate them efficiently in their digital printing workflow, due to our innovative image management tools and departmental interconnectivity.

Media contacts:
Jill Taylor, Corporate Communications Director, Global Graphics Software
Jill.taylor@globalgraphics.com | Tel +44 (0)1223 926489
Mobile: +44 (0)7714 410598

Paula Halpin, PR & Marketing Executive, Global Graphics Software
Paula.halpin@globalgraphics.com | Tel: +44 (0)1223 926017

Alba Banos, Inèdit Software
alba@Inèdit.com | Tel: +34 661 391 247

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neocatalog textile design software

Overcoming challenges with digital textile workflow (Article hosted by WTIN)

The textile printing sector is experiencing a period of inactivity due to the global quarantines established by governments because of Covid-19. The virus was first detected in China last December and soon brought the country’s textile industry to a complete standstill. This sent shockwaves through the textile supply chain and caused a dramatic drop in revenue for companies operating in the digital textile printing market.

By early spring, the virus had become a global pandemic and forced industries to reinvent themselves to overcome the economic and social crisis caused by the pandemic. In the textile printing sector, according to the latest study published by the ITMF, orders have fallen by 41% and a decrease in business of 33% is expected.

However, according to Inédit offices in China, bigger factories have survived by diversifying their activities. In contrast, small and medium-sized organisations have been left struggling to stay afloat.

This situation means companies are now considering new challenges. We find a sector that has come to a standstill, where the production chain remains static due to a lack of active suppliers and buyers. In Europe and the US, the consumption of fashion has been severely restricted to combat the virus, but when high streets are reopened there is no guarantee of a quick recovery. Brands and retailers have limited plans for the current spring/summer season and economists are forecasting worrying sales figures. Textile manufacturers in countries that rely on exports for a strong economy are bearing the brunt of this crisis.

But these current challenges have also opened up new opportunities in the sector. Some companies have chosen to branch out and manufacture much-needed personal protective equipment (PPE). In China, where economic recovery is under way, some textile printing OEMs are looking to expand their product catalogues by introducing a range of new machines that target face mask production.

Other enterprises have begun preparing resources for the implementation of digital textile printing technologies, whereas some are looking beyond the pandemic and are preparing for a more sustainable manufacturing industry.

INFLUENCE OF INKJET

Digital printing has been an ally of textile finishers in this moment of crisis because the technology is much more versatile than analogue alternatives. Companies that have invested in digital structures will be better placed to answer the immediate needs of clients. This is especially true if, during this transition, they have been maintaining the infrastructure that enables customised and on-demand printing.

These processes lead to a reduction in production costs for digital companies that will mean greater flexibility for the manufacturer when adapting to the new situation.

A common question being asked is how to prepare a digital team for this new norm?

We summarise it in two basic points: have everything ready to go; and improve communication in the workflow.

When we advise the client to be ready to proceed, we are referring to the importance of having the infrastructure in place by the time the industry starts up again, which will help to ensure a quick response. It is important to know the status of the printers and the best way to do this is to print a colour proof. With this test, companies will be able to see if their printers are still producing the same colours, or if they match their requirements. If necessary, the printers can be re-profiled to obtain the desired results. With neoStampa RIP software it is an easy process to carry out and this test will help organisations to better understand the health of the inks, print heads and the general quality of the printers they have. Preventative measures can then be taken to minimise machine downtime in the future.

It is not only necessary to prepare the machinery; it is also important to keep the team informed and prepared for new developments. Whether you decide to diversify your activity or wait for the textile sector to start up again, the design, production and commercial teams must be ready to start working.

CONNECTED WORKFLOW

One thing that particularly concerns our customers is how to maintain communication between departments, and even between customers, with current restrictions on mobility. This is what we call having the workflow connected in digital printing: being able to maintain communication between different departments without the need to be physically there.

Inédit Software has been working for years to create these connections, which are becoming more necessary with every passing day. Companies that base their designers at the headquarters in one country and print in another benefit the most from technologies that enable this level of communication. There are different solutions that help to improve this communication flow, which are specialised in the sector.

One of the main points of this workflow connection is the communication with the client. Although production is minimal in most economies due to order cancellations and border closures, design creation has continued and work on new seasons has already begun. Sales teams, therefore, must start selling the designs, but they cannot go to see the client or showcase the products at events.

Neocatalog Textile Design Software

An interesting solution is the creation of a virtual showroom through which clients can be presented with the designs that are for sale. Virtual showrooms enable businesses to demonstrate how simple it is to modify designs at a moment’s notice. There are even tools that will allow a business to present a design in a 3D simulation. The client will have the product at their disposal and the salesperson will have the facility to show it without having to be physically there. One tool designed specifically for this purpose is neoCatalog – a collection of designs that are stored on a business’ own server. neoCatalog enables designs and galleries to be sent directly to clients.

The second area of concern in the sector is communication within the company. One of the consequences of the pandemic has been the increase in teleworking around the world. Communication between design and production departments has always been the key to a good workflow connection, especially because of the need to accurately manage colour throughout the printing process which remains one of the biggest challenges in the market today. But with strategic workflow communication, it should be possible to send designs to print from anywhere in the world with the necessary color profile to obtain high-quality results.

FORECASTING THE FUTURE

We are optimistic about the future of the textile printing industry. Even though we are going through a rough patch right now, we are conscious of the power of digitalisation. We still anticipate big changes to come.

We believe the relocation of factories will be intensified and with digitalisation we are likely to see micro-factories appearing in new countries in response to fast fashion. But in the short-term, we believe companies will continue to expand their operations in order to capitalize on high demand for medical-grade textiles.

The industry needs to come to terms with a new reality in which software and connected systems are the protagonists and remote working becomes the norm. A company that has a well-communicated workflow and has the factory ready to accept orders – as well as one that can invest in new digital equipment – is best placed to survive this new era and prosper in the long-term. It is important to modernise so that customer needs are always met.

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